Tag Archives: Seattle Seahawks

My Way Too Early Speculation of Where Le’Veon Bell Will Land in 2019

Le’Veon Bell’s time in Pittsburgh is clearly coming to an end. But, where will the All-Pro, all-purpose back land in 2019?

It’s clear the Pittsburgh Steelers and All-Pro running back Le’Veon Bell are headed for a divorce. At this point the relationship appears unsalvageable after his teammates, specifically the offensive line, recklessly spoke about his contract situation and reluctance to show up for their week one matchup against the Cleveland Browns. He’s even been removed from the depth chart for week two’s matchup with the Kansas City Chiefs.

Bell hasn’t signed his $14.5 million franchise tender, and will be docked $850 thousand for each game his misses. He wants a contract that will reset the market for top-flight running backs. Similar to what the LA Rams signed Todd Gurley to; 4 years, $60 million with $45 guaranteed. The 3-time All-Pro is two years older and unlikely to get that money from the Steelers, especially with the way his replacement, 2nd-year pro James Conner has performed so far in his absence in week one against the Cleveland Browns and training camp.

Bell’s not likely to get a long-term deal because of his age, but he’s a perfect match for teams that are in win now mode. Honestly, that’s the type of team he should be looking for, especially if he’s going to leave a franchise in Pittsburgh that’s always in the championship race.

So assuming it’s really over for Bell in the 412. Where could he land? Who needs him? Who could/is willing to pay him what he desires? Here is my way too early speculation of where he might land in 2019.

New York Jets. The Jets were in the hunt for quarterback Kirk Cousins and willing to pay him top dollar (I know QB money and RB money is different) before he chose the Minnesota Vikings and they drafted Sam Darnold with the third overall pick in the 2018 draft. They also were interested in acquiring Khalil Mack from the Oakland Raiders before he was eventually shipped off to the Chicago Bears. My point for bringing up those two players is to show that the Jets organization has the money and appears willing and desires to make a splash. Now that they appear to have a franchise QB in Darnold on a rookie contract, and their defense looks to be more than formidable, they’re only missing a top flight back. The three best friends for a young quarterback are an elite tackle to protect his blindside, a stout defense and a strong running game. Bell would help the team check the final box. Also, it’s New York. Bell likes the spotlight, and an offer anywhere near Gurley’s, even if it doesn’t top it, would likely pique his interest and make the Jets a strong contender in the AFC.

Indianapolis Colts. They’ve been trying to pair Andrew Luck with a running back since the day he was drafted to replace Peyton Manning. They’ve tried just about everything. Last season it was then 35-year old Frank Gore. In previous seasons they went as far as trading for Trent Richardson when he flamed out with the Cleveland Browns after being drafted two slots behind Luck in the 2012 draft. Nothing has worked. The Colts finally have invested in their offensive line to protect their wounded franchise QB. The other way to further that protection, get him an elite running back. Bell is worth the money if the Colts really think Luck is the championship caliber QB to lead them.

Green Bay Packers. The Pack desperately needs to get a running game to compliment Aaron Rodgers. Even though he is superhuman, at some point you put him at too much risk, being predictable by allowing him to drop back and sling it all over the field. They need balance. Green Bay was also interested in acquiring Khalil Mack before he was traded to the Bears. So they too are in win at all cost mode, NOW. Bell would give them a dimension they’ve NEVER had in A-A-Ron’s time under center in cheese country. A balanced attack would make the best QB in the game even scarier.

DARK HORSES

Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Who knows what Jameis Winston’s future is in west Florida, but if they keep him beyond his rookie contract that ends in 2019, and he improves on and off the field, their offense has everything but an elite running back. The combination of DeSean Jackson, Mike Evans at wide receiver positions and OJ Howard at tight end is lethal. With Bell they’d have better weapons than what he’s currently apart of in the Burgh. Tampa Bay’s defense led by Gerald McCoy, Lavonte David and Brent Grimes is stout. Bell would make the Bucs the favorites in the best division in the NFL, the NFC South. A division that has been represented in the Super Bowl 2 of the last three seasons.

Seattle Seahawks. When Russell Wilson was at his best, he had “Beast Mode” Marshawn Lynch behind him. Even though he’s improved each season, their offense has been very predictable and Wilson playing sandlot ball. Now, they just spent their 2018 first round pick (27th overall) on Rashad Penny out of San Diego State who led FCS in rushing with 2,027 yards in 2017. So this is less likely than the other teams I have mentioned. However, Bell is a different animal, and if you can get him, YOU. GET. HIM.

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2018 NFL Rookies Most Likely Too…

The 2018 NFL season is drawing closer as Training Camps have opened across the League. Hopefully, we can spend more time talking about the action on the field and not who is, or isn’t showing up at the Hall of Famer enshrinement and other off-the-field issues.

The excitement is high to see the return of All-Pros and perennial Pro Bowlers that missed last season due to injury like J.J. Watt, David Johnson, Odell Beckham Junior and Andrew Luck to name a few. But, there’s also the anticipation of watching new stars begin their pro football journey.

256 players were drafted in April–39 linebackers, the most of any position–and there are several dozens more that will make rosters as free agents. I looked into my crystal ball and here’s how I see the 2018 class fairing in their careers.

Josh Rosen felt he should’ve been the number one overall pick, saying “there were nine mistakes made ahead of me.” The UCLA product will be out to prove he was right. Photo Courtesy: USA Today

Most likely to lead the NFL in passing yards….

Josh Rosen (10th Overall Pick), Arizona Cardinals. Rosen was considered the most pro-ready of the quarterbacks in the 2018 class, having played in a pro-style system at UCLA, for a former NFL head coach. He’ll also play in an NFC West division that arguably has the best collective talent at the QB position. The style of play is even more up-tempo than the direction the rest of the league has taken. The opportunities will be there as he goes toe to toe with Russell Wilson, Jimmy Garoppolo and Jared Goff.

Most likely to lead the NFL in rushing yards….

The safe and most popular pick would be Saquon Barkley of the New York Giants, the second overall selection in the draft. While I believe Barkley will be a very productive back in both the run and pass game with the Giants, in the mold of Pittsburgh Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell, but because he plays on the same unit as Odell Beckham Junior, Sterling Shepherd and Evan Ingram, New York will have a more balanced attack and he won’t carry the ball at a high rate.

So I’m going with another NFC East rookie runner, Darius Guice of Washington. The Former LSU back was selected with the 59th pick in the 2nd round. He slipped in the draft due to character issues, but many “experts” claim he was a first round talent. Guice is a physical, downhill runner who at 5’11” 224 pounds wants to play like Marshawn Lynch. He’ll be playing with Alex Smith who handed off to the 2017 NFL Leading rusher Kareem Hunt in Kansas City last season. Hunt was a 3rd round selection (pick 86) last spring.

Most likely to lead the NFL in receptions, receiving yards or receiving TDs

Michael Gallup (3rd round, 81st Pick), Dallas Cowboys. Jason Whitten has retired. Dez Bryant is on the free agent market struggling to find a new home. The Cowboys will be looking for a new threat in the passing game for third-year QB Dak Prescott to build chemistry with. Gallup caught 176 passes for 2,690 yards (15.3 ypc) and 21 touchdowns in his two seasons at Colorado State. Someone will have to be Prescott’s number one option when defenses load the box to stop Zeke Elliott.

Most likely to lead the NFL in turnovers…

Sam Darnold, QB, New York Jets. The third overall pick out of USC had his troubles taking care of the pigskin in college, especially against top-notch competition. He’s going to see that quality and even better every week in the NFL. This doesn’t mean he won’t have a great career, Eli Manning has led the League in turnovers twice in his career and he’s probably going to get a Gold Jacket. But Darnold is being heralded as a “Savior” for a franchise that’s been dormant for nearly a decade, especially at that position. That means he’ll likely be the first of the 2018 class of QB’s to be thrown into the fire early in their career, and make several rookie mistakes.

Most likely to lead the league in tackles…

Roquan Smith (8th Overall Pick) Chicago Bears. The Georgia Bulldog linebacker could be the next great linebacker in the Bears book of great backers. The 2017 Butkus Award winner and SEC Defensive Player of the Year, racked up 252 total tackles in his three seasons “Between the Hedges.” 137 of them came last season, 14 of them for loss. Smith has a nose for the football and is always around the action. In the “Windy City” he’ll be counted on early to help the 10th ranked total defense in 2017 stop Aaron Rodgers, Matthew Stafford and Kirk Cousins.

Most likely to lead the league in sacks…

Bradley Chubb (5th overall pick) Denver Broncos. This could very well happen in his rookie season with the attention Von Miller will attract on the other side of the field, plus linebackers Brandon Marshall, Shane Ray and Defensive End Derek Wolfe. Who do you think is going to get the least amount of attention from opposing offensive units? This answer is Chubb. The North Carolina State product recorded 10 sacks in each of his last two seasons with the Wolfpack and 25 total in his four-year career. He also made 21 and 23 tackles for loss, proving he lives in offenses backfields.

Most likely to lead the League in interceptions (takeaways)….

Josh Jackson (2 round, pick 45) Green Bay Packers. His ball hawking skills are elite. Many have compared him to Richard Sherman, and he looked the part against Ohio State last season when he picked off 3 passes and took one to the house. The 2017 Big Ten Defensive Back of the Year, intercepted 8 passes last season and took 2 back for touchdowns. He’s a big DB at 6’1″, 196 pounds, which is the direction the League is going to counter the bigger athletic wide receivers.

Most likely to be Offensive Rookie of the Year…. 

Saquon Barkley (2nd overall pick), New York Giants. You can never go wrong betting on a running back, because history has shown us they adjust to the pro game quicker. Three of the last five winners of this award were running backs. Don’t expect that to change this season. If Eli Manning continues to struggle, as he has in recent seasons, the Giants best bet to compete in what will be a highly competitive NFC East, will be to hand the ball to Barkley in the run and pass game. On another note, no Giants rookie has ever rushed for 1,000+ yards, so Barkley would be making history as well.

Most likely to be Defensive Rookie of the Year…

Mike Hughes, Minnesota Vikings (1 round, pick 30). The NFL is a predominant passing league, which means the players on the defensive side of the ball that have the best chance to standout are pass rushers and defensive backs. Hughes was a star for the UCF Knights self-claimed National Championship team. In his only season in Orlando, he intercepted 4 passes taking one back for six and broke up 11 passes. He’ll be playing on a defense that rank first last season. Hughes is also a return specialist, having returned 2 kickoffs and 1 punt for touchdowns last season. His involvement, and success, in special teams will catapult him into voters conscious.

Most likely to be steal of the draft…

Orlando Brown (3rd round, 83rd pick), Baltimore Ravens. Other than running back, the players that have the least struggle transitioning to the pro game are offensive lineman. The “Big Uglies” typically have the biggest upside with the lowest risk of any position. That’s why I’m going with Brown. The 2017 Unanimous All-American and two-time Big 12 Lineman of the Year had a disastrous performance at the combine, causing his draft stock to fall. But, Brown was considered a first-round talent. He comes from great pedigree. His father, the late Orlando “Zeus” Brown Senior, played six seasons for the Ravens, starting 80 games. Brown Junior will be surrounded with people who will be invested in him as a player, but as a person due to his ties with the organization.

Griffin (49) is a sentimental hero, but don’t let that blind you from the fact that he’s an elite athlete with the skills and determination to be great. Photo Courtesy: USA Today.

Most likely to be a perennial All-Pro…. 

Shaquem Griffin (5th round, 141 pick) Seattle Seahawks. Everyone fell so in love with his inspiring story, a guy playing without a hand, that they almost ignored his dominating performance for a UCF Knight team that was the only team in major college football to finish the 2017 season undefeated.

His combine test scores alone should have catapulted him into the first round, but teams were scared off by what they consider a disability. They’ll undoubtedly, regret that. Then there’s his game film. If you watched any one UCF game in 2017, you saw this guy pop off the screen. He totaled 17 sacks and 30 tackles for loss in his college career as a linebacker. You should never better against a guy that’s overcome what he has. Playing along side his twin brother in Seattle, I see him being able to lead the new era of Seahawks like he did in central Florida.

Most likely to be NFL Defensive Player of the Year…

Bradley Chubb, for the same reasons I mentioned previously as to why I feel he will lead the NFL in sacks. Pass rushers are a premium in the League, and historically, they win this award more than any other defensive positions. The last eight winners were pass rushers, Calais Campbell, Khalil Mack and JJ Watt were the most recent winners. If he can disrupt NFL QBs like his new teammate, Von Miller, he will take home this award at some point in his career.

Most likely to be NFL MVP….

This award always goes to the quarterback who’s on the team with the best record in the League. In the last ten seasons, a quarterback won the award nine times. Running Back Adrian Peterson was the exception in 2012. So of course I should pick a QB, right? Yes, and I’m going with Sam Darnold. If you’ve read this far — first off, thanks — you know I believe Darnold will be a turnover machine early on in his career, which he was in college. But, I like his overall makeup and I think the early growing pains are going to serve him greatly in his development. If he wins games in that city, for that organization, he’ll have the big market bias and narrative, voters swoon over.

Best Fits For Colin Kaepernick

That is if he isn’t REALLY being blackballed by NFL owners and executives.

Colin Kaepernick still has something left in the tank, but where will he get to display it next is the question. Photo Credit: NFL

Colin Kaepernick deserves a chance to play in the NFL. I won’t go over the list of quarterbacks who can’t compare to him that have already been signed this offseason. That angle has been beaten to death. Rather I’d like to look at the team’s that should be in demand of his skill set.

Let me also set this up by acknowledging that Kaepernick is in starting QB purgatory. He’s like an award winning lead actor who’s had several Box Office flops and now studios only inquire about his interest in a supporting role until he can get that “it” back that sold out theaters. It’s like that episode of “Entourage” when Vincent Chase had to settle for the supporting role in the “Smokejumpers” film after his fallout with Alan the head of Warner Brothers over the “Aquaman” sequel and “Medellin.” Like Vince’s agent Ari Gold told him “you’re in movie star jail.” That’s Kaepernick’s situation now.

Even though the last few seasons with the San Francisco 49ers wasn’t Colin’s fault, you can blame Owner Jed York and General manager Trent Baalke for that, Colin has to accept the fact that he’s not a starting QB right now. I put emphasis on right now. That’s not to say he still can’t be, it’s just that no team is going to invest in him being their starter at this point.

As far as his play, Colin is the definition of a dual threat quarterback. He’s not the historic prototype like Tom Brady, Eli Manning, Aaron Rodgers or Andrew Luck. So he can’t fit into any system and thrive. Think of the trouble Michael Vick had finding a team in his latter years. Kaepernick needs to be in a system where the incumbent starter does many of the same things he does best and the offense resembles the read option that helped him when he led the Niners to the Super Bowl and the NFC title game the season after.

The goal for him should be to get on a team that will help him best show that his skills haven’t eroded, just the situation around him in “The Bay” did, and possibly gain a starting offer for 2018.

With that being said, these are the teams I think he’ll be a great fit for as a backup. All of these teams have entrenched starters who play similar to the way Colin played in his best days. None of these teams would have to change their offensive schemes to fit Colin if he were called upon. That’s the “football reason” many are using to avoid signing him.

Seattle Seahawks. Can you name the Seahawks backup QB? Didn’t think so. It’s Trevone Boykin who has some off-the-field issues he has to deal with this offseason. You wouldn’t know that because Russell Wilson hasn’t missed much time since he took over in the great northwest. However, their offense suits the superior athleticism and improvisation both Wilson and Kaepernick thrive on. Wilson also struggled with some lower leg injuries last season that he played through when he probably shouldn’t have if they had a capable backup on the roster.

Plus, that locker room and head coach Pete Carroll is tailor made to handle the “distractions” that will come with signing Kaep. Plus many of the guys in that locker room agree with his anthem protest, which he says he won’t continue this season.

Carolina Panthers. Cam Newton takes a beating, which is why he just had shoulder surgery to repair a torn labrum. Derek Anderson is currently his backup. He’s a totally different QB than Cam, thus the Panthers would have to drastically alter their gameplan  if he’s needed to take snaps. Anderson is more suited to be Andrew Luck or Ben Roethlisberger’s backup. Kaep would allow Carolina to keep their same physical run first style in any absence of Newton.

Tennessee Titans. Marcus Mariotta is coming off a late season broken leg that could slow him down to start the 2017 season. His understudy is Matt Cassell. Those two couldn’t be any different. The Titans are also a run first offense with read option concepts. They rely heavily on their running backs DeMarco Murray and 2-year back Derrick Henry.

Buffalo Bills. If Tyrod Taylor really is their franchise QB, it makes more sense to have Kaepernick behind him than Cardale Jones, who I love, but is more like Roethlisberger or Carson Palmer. The Bills also have a strong running game led by LeSean Mccoy. Notice a theme here?

Miami Dolphins. Despite his size (6’4″ 216) Ryan Tannehill, a former wide receiver at Texas A&M, plays a more mobile game than pocket passer. Miami’s a more heavy rushing offense with Jay Ajayi in their backfield, with many read option concepts. Their backup is Matt Moore, who is more of a pocket passer. Moore is a career backup, which is why he’s in Miami, but as he showed when Tannehill was injured late last season, he can’t duplicate the success of the starter that helped get the Dolphins into the playoffs for the first time in eight seasons.

Dallas Cowboys. With Tony Romo retired that leaves a significant void behind Dak Prescott. Right now the backup is Kellen Moore. You sure you want him to be the 2nd option? Remember how he fared in 2015 when Romo was injured for most of the season? You may say “the Cowboys wanted to move on from Romo because they don’t need Dak looking over his shoulder.” Like I said previously, at this point Kaepernick is a backup. Romo had shown when he is healthy that he’s a starter. That’s why there was a distraction, because everyone assumed Dallas would be better than they were with Dak if Romo was in the lineup. No one would be making those assumptions with Kaepernick. But Cowboy fans would feel much safer with him on the roster in case Dak were injured or suffered from a “Sophomore Slump.” Plus they have 2016 NFL rushing leader Ezekiel Elliott, keeping with my run first theme.

All these teams I’ve looked at are heavy rushing offenses. That’s what the 49ers were in their best days with Kaepernick under center with the franchise’s all-time leading rushing Frank Gore in the backfield. Also with their style of play, they put the starter in harms way often. Signing Kaepernick would be the best insurance policy out there. After a season excelling as a backup it’s likely he’d get one of those deals Mike Glennon jut got.

Now that there is one less quarterback option on the market for teams in need, Kaepernick’s name should be coming up more. Hopefully his unemployment will end very soon, if not then we know what it is.

The Seattle Seahawks Mt. Rushmore

The great Northwest’s team has had a great run in the last decade.

The Seattle Seahawks have had a good run in the last four years, making the playoffs each season, winning Super Bowl XLVIII, and nearly winning Super Bowl XLIX if it weren’t for some terrible play calling. However, this franchise is approaching middle age, having been an NFL franchise for 42 years and playing 40 seasons thus far.

The Pacific Northwest’s team has won 3 NFC Championships since 2005, made the playoffs 8 times, and won the NFC West 6 times. The Seahawks have enjoyed a great level of success in the last decade, but being in the far corner of the country has caused many of their greats of the past–from when the teams wasn’t as successful–to have been forgotten. But, they’ll get their due here. This is my Mount Rushmore for the Seattle Seahawks.

CRITERIA:

  • No owners, unless they were also coaches, and their place on this list is based on their contributions as coach. No General Managers or Personnel executives. Just those who directly affected the games on Sunday. I will make a separate list for those contributors soon. 
  • Key contributors to the team’s history and success, not just fan favorites or box office draws.
  • Can you tell the franchise’s story without them? If no, they’re on the list.

Steve Largent (1976-1989) is one of the greatest wide receivers in NFL history, and many have disrespectfully forgotten his greatness. Largent was the guy the great Jerry Rice was chasing and eventually passed. When THIS #80 retired, he held all of the major records for a receiver in NFL history, including most catches (819), receiving yards (13,089) and touchdown catches (100). He also played 177 consecutive games with a catch, which was then a record. He’s the first player to catch 100 touchdowns in a career. All of these are still Seattle franchise records. Largent is the first Seahawk player to ever make a Pro-Bowl, a feat he accomplished seven times. He was a 5-time All-Pro, a member of the Seahawks 35th Anniversary Team and NFL 1980s All-Decade Team. In 1985 he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. His jersey number 80 was retired in 1992.

Walter Jones (1997-2009) is considered by many to be the best offensive lineman during his career. Jones was a 9-time Pro Bowl selection and 7-time All-Pro. He paved the way for Shaun Alexander to become the franchise’s all-time leading rusher. He was honored by being selected to the NFL’s 2000s All Decade Team, and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2014. The Seahawks retired his jersey number 71 in 2010, making him only the third player in team history to receive such an honor.

Cortez Kennedy (1990-2000) was an 8-time Pro Bowl selection and 5-time All-Pro. When he retired, he was the Seahawks 4th all-time leader in sacks (58) and 3rd in tackles (568). In 1992 he was named NFL Defensive Player of the Year. Kennedy is a member of the NFL 1990s All-Decade Team, Seahawks Ring of Honor, and Pro Football Hall of Fame (2012). The Seahawks retired his number 96 in 2012.

Matt Hasselbeck (2001-2010) is Seattle’s all-time career leader in passing yards (29,434), completions (2,559), attempts (4250) and 2nd in touchdown passes (174). The 3-time Pro Bowl selection led the team to its first ever Super Bowl (XL loss to Pittsburgh). He’s also a member of the Seahawks 35th Anniversary team.

Twelve’s I want to hear from you. Do you agree or disagree with this list? You would you rather see on it, and you would you replace? Let me know.

Steelers-Seahawks Keys to Watch


The Pittsburgh Steelers aren’t likely to win the AFC North with the 8-2 Cincinnati Bengals sitting at the top 3 games up on the Black & Yellow with 6 games remaining and only one head to head matchup. Yet, the Steelers are going for the NFC West crown. Pittsburgh is 3-0 against the NFC West this season, beating San Francisco, St. Louis and Arizona. Now, fresh off the BYE week, here comes the Seattle Seahawks.

Seattle is now 5-5 after beating the San Francisco 49ers 29-13. This matchup has huge playoff implications in both the AFC and NFC. Both teams need a victory to stay in the Wild Card hunt, as each isn’t likely to win its division.

FiveThirtyEight.com, a site that uses statistical analysis to predict each week’s games, gives the reigning NFC Champions a 65% chance to beat the Steelers. ESPN’s FPI only gives the Steelers a 42% chance to win. The odds makers in Vegas are giving the Steelers +3.5. Take those numbers for whatever they’re worth to you. Anyway, here are some keys for Pittsburgh to get win number 7 on the season.

The Seahawks are 0-5 when allowing their opposition to score 20+ points. The Steelers average 23.6 points per game. But, with Roethlisberger in the lineup, they average 25.7. It seems simple to say all Roethlisberger and the Killer B’s need to do is out score the Hawks, but in this case, if they can hit that mark, that’s half the battle.

My favorite stat to watch during a game is third down efficiency.  The Seahawks defense is 4th in the NFL at 32%. The Steelers offense is 26th at 35% in converting. A team’s ability or inability to get off the field on defense, or stay on the field when on offense aids their effort to win. Keep your eye on this stat throughout the game. If the Steelers are winning in this area, they’re likely to win.

The other key stat to watch, is of course turnovers. The once vaunted “Legion of Boom” only has 4 interceptions on the season. This season, they’ve only created a total of 11 turnovers. The Steelers are +5 in the turnover margin on the season. Their defense has created 18 turnovers in 2015, 9 interceptions and 9 fumbles. Edge Pittsburgh.

Seattle’s D gives up 303.6 yards per game. That’s 2nd in the NFL behind the Denver Broncos. Pittsburgh Offense is 6th in the NFL at 384.9 yards per game. This is strength on strength. Yards per game stats can be deceiving because one team may be playing from behind, while the other has gone into a prevent just to salt the game away. The Seahawks have blown a 4th quarter lead in all 5 of their losses.

Lastly, if the Steelers are to move to 7-4, they’ll have to stop the number 1 rushing attack in the NFL. Seattle average 148.6 yards per game, and has a balanced attack with Marshawn Lynch–who didn’t play Sunday against San Francisco due to an abdomen injury that may require surgery–and QB Russell Wilson. Pittsburgh is 5th in the league against the run, allowing only 93 yards per game on the ground.

One more key-note: Head Coach Mike Tomlin and the Steelers are 6-2 in his tenure after the break. Kickoff is Sunday at 4:25 PM in Century Link Field.

 

Don’t Just Blame Pete

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Carroll accepts full blame for Super Bowl XLIV Loss. Courtesy: Getty Images

“There’s really nobody to blame but me…” Those were the words from Seattle Seahawks Head Coach Pete Carroll after his team lost Super Bowl XLIX 28-24 to the New England Patriots.

Everyone is blaming Carroll for not calling running back Marshawn Lynch’s number on the 1 yard line with 20 seconds left in the game and allowing Russell Wilson to throw a pass that was intercepted by the Patriots’ Malcolm Butler to seal the win. It’s being called “the worse play call in NFL history.” But that play is only where they lost the opportunity to win, they lost when their vaunted, proud—some say arrogant—defense gave up a 10 point lead in the 4th quarter.

The final stanza began with the Seahawks up 24-14 and looking like they were ready to pin their ears back and tee off on Tom Brady. They had already picked him off twice and had his top targets Edelman and Gronkowski pretty much in check.

How quickly things changed. #12 was 13-15 for 124 yards and 2 touchdowns in the 4th—He finished 37-50 for 328 yards and 4 TDs. That’s why he left University of Phoenix Stadium with his fourth Super Bowl win and third Super Bowl MVP Trophy.

The Legion of Boom, the number one ranked total defense in 2014, that only gave up an average of 15.9 points per game, gave up a 9 play 68 yard touchdown drive and a 10 play 64 yard touchdown drive to lose their lead. Before Sunday night, no team in Super Bowl history had ever comeback from a larger deficit in the 4th quarter. They deserve their share of the blame.

There are several other plays Seattle could’ve made to seal their second consecutive Super Bowl victory. What if Jermaine Kerse doesn’t drop the 3rd down deep pass in scoring position with 1:12 left in the third quarter that let the Patriots defense off the field? What if Earl Thomas doesn’t get an unnecessary roughness penalty that gave the Patriots 15 free yards at the end of a short catch and run by Shane Vereen that put them in scoring position? What if the Seahawks turned both Brady interceptions into points?

There’s blame to go all around. Pete Carroll and offensive coordinator Darrell Bevel deserve theirs for the final play call, quarterback Russell Wilson his for throwing the pass. But as cornerback Richard Sherman said on the podium Sunday Night “everybody understands it didn’t come down to one play, there was a number of plays throughout the game we could’ve made and extended our lead and guys understand that…” That’s why the Seahawks aren’t Back to Back Super Bowl Champions.